Appraisal Management News

FDIC Expects Fewer Bank Losses than Originally Estimated

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Appraiser News Online

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation lowered its projections on estimated bank-failure losses in the coming years, the FDIC announced Oct. 11. Bank failures are now estimated to cost the Deposit Insurance Fund $19 billion through 2015 compared to the estimated $23 billion in losses in 2010 alone.

Acting FDIC Chairman Martin J. Gruenberg said the fund is on track to recover and will meet the goals established by Congress, including a requirement that the fund reserve ratio reach 1.35 percent by Sept. 30, 2020.

The Deposit Insurance Fund’s balance has climbed for six consecutive quarters following seven previous quarterly declines, reaching a balance of $3.9 billion in the second quarter of 2011. That’s an increase of nearly $25 billion from its negative balance of $20.9 billion at the close of 2009.

Responding to the FDIC’s announcement, Jim Chessen, chief economist at the American Bankers Association, noted in American Banker Oct. 16 that the data “reaffirms the fact that the banking industry is rapidly returning to health and the losses once expected were overstated.” Chessen reported that the FDIC had set aside $17.7 billion for bank-failure losses in 2011, twice what is estimated to actually be needed for the year.

The American Bankers Association reported that banks pay $13.5 billion in annual premiums to the FDIC, which is well above the yearly costs the agency expected over the next few years and showed that the fund is rebuilding much faster than anticipated.

 

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Written by appraisalmanagementnews

October 20, 2011 at 1:35 pm

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