Appraisal Management News

What New Jumbo Mortgage Rules Mean for Expensive Zip Codes

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Yahoo! Finance

On Oct. 1, the size of mortgages eligible for purchase by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will shrink. That isn’t necessarily a big deal in most parts of the country; the new lower limit of $625,500 — down from today’s $729,750 — still is big enough to cover most homes in almost all markets in the United States.

Furthermore, mortgage bankers are stepping up with new money to cover those bigger loans, reports Mortgage Daily. "Programs here and there are popping up," says publisher Sam Garcia. He reports that some new lenders, including TMS Funding and New Penn Financial LLC, are launching programs that will make mortgages as big as $2 million available to lenders with good credit scores and enough cash to keep up with the payments. And many existing mortgage lenders currently will make those so-called "jumbo" loans and just keep them in their portfolios instead of selling them.

But those loans will cost more. Currently the difference between rates on so-called conforming loans and private-made loans is about 0.64 percent. Over the last two years that spread has been as low as 0.48 percent and higher than one percent, says Garcia.

So in some pricey places, the new limits will really pinch borrowers. Those limits vary from market to market and are determined in part by local housing prices. In expensive housing markets where prices have fallen, the limits will drop the most. Hardest to be hit, according to a new analysis by Move.com, will be San Diego, where loans up until $697,500 qualify for Fannie and Freddie until Sept. 30. On Oct. 1, that limit drops to $546,250, a $151,250 difference.

Folks there who want to borrow a bunch for a home will see their costs rise significantly. A San Diego homebuyer who needs $600,000 would pay $2,937 a month for a 30-year loan at today’s rate of 4.18 percent, according to Bankrate.com. Starting next month, if rates stay stable and that borrower goes to a private lender, he would pay $3,155 a month. That’s $228 more a month, or $82,080 more over 30 years.

Some buyers (and lenders) may try to get around that by piggy-backing loans; piling a smaller non-conforming loan onto a conforming loan.

Here are some other areas, most often searched on Realtor.com, that could see significant changes in their loan limits, according to the Move analysis.

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Written by appraisalmanagementnews

September 26, 2011 at 3:45 pm

Posted in Economy

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